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Old 02-20-2019, 12:41 PM
TimberArt TimberArt is offline
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Default Considering Lathe for SR44

Per the title I am considering the lathe for my Stinger 2 SR44. When I bought my machine last year I ordered it lathe ready. I know a couple wood workers that I could offer custom legs to as they said they are tired of using hair pin legs on their tables. I know this is a hard question to answer as there are a lot of variables at play here, but how long does it take to turn a fairly basic leg with the stock down to say 1" of the largest part of a 36"long leg? Maybe putting a couple barley twist on it. I know the lathe is not as fast as a regular lathe but just wondering if it would be worth the time and money to add it on and if I could get my added investment back on it.

Thanks for any input, opinions and suggestions,
Bill
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Old 02-20-2019, 10:06 PM
The real JP The real JP is offline
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For me it is better to buy legs. I have made a few applied turnings on my machine bed though.

I will make my own square tapered legs on the jointer, but that takes minutes.
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  #3  
Old 02-21-2019, 08:10 AM
mike.davison mike.davison is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TimberArt View Post
... but how long does it take to turn a fairly basic leg with the stock down to say 1" of the largest part of a 36"long leg?
Hey Bill, you can get a reasonable estimate from Aspire if that's the tool you would be using. You would also learn how to do the development in the process. That said, if the leg must be done with 3d raster tool paths it's slow. Very slow. Super slow. 2 hours per leg slow. If you can create a design that uses profile bits and can learn how to do the less obvious design work to use those cutters it's faster. 15 minutes.

But.... if you want a custom leg that can be reproduced multiple times with precision. Slow is, for many people, acceptable. I'd say if you're making 4-12 spindles then a rotary axis is a good solution. If you're making 100 you need a true CNC lathe rather than a rotary+spindle.
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Old 02-22-2019, 08:46 AM
TimberArt TimberArt is offline
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Thanks fellas I appreciate the info. I might be better off using square or tapered legs and v carving something fancy for these guys inquiring about them.

I looked on the internet for 4" legs and they are very expensive even for pine. With that being said, for the time involved using the indexing lathe I just don't see where I could make 4 legs and offer a reasonable price on them.

Bill
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Old 02-22-2019, 09:03 AM
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Gary Campbell Gary Campbell is offline
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Bill...
$.02 from the cheap seats.

As a rule (1), if the product could be cut on a traditional wood lathe, then usually you would be disappointed in the cutting times using a rotary axis. That said, and as stated above, for a small quantity and balanced with the ability to cut them, the rotary machining time may be acceptable.

Rule 2: The CAMaster Recoil Ornamental lathe is all the things that a traditional wood lathe is not. Other than the fact that you can use a chuck, and the work revolves around centers, it is the antithesis of a wood lathe. Just like its namesake: "The Ornamental Lathe" that would make ornamental parts using a "player piano" type mechanism. (look it up)

If you need CNC turning then you need to find a CNC wood lathe equipped shop, build one, or buy one from me: https://youtu.be/4j_GFr0spSE

There are a number of rotary and CNC lathe videos on my YouTube page: https://www.youtube.com/user/Islaww1/videos
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Old 02-22-2019, 10:29 AM
SteveNelson46 SteveNelson46 is offline
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Maybe this is the obvious answer but, ornamental lathes are not for a production shop where time is money. They are more for the "one off" hobbyist where time isn't a factor. As Gary said, if you have the need for speed buy a CNC lathe.
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Old 02-22-2019, 11:05 AM
TimberArt TimberArt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveNelson46 View Post
Maybe this is the obvious answer but, ornamental lathes are not for a production shop where time is money. They are more for the "one off" hobbyist where time isn't a factor. As Gary said, if you have the need for speed buy a CNC lathe.
Not necessarily the need for speed Steve but more the return on the investment. Just not seeing it around my neck of the woods. I'd be better off sending the guys else ware for what they are looking for.
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Old 02-22-2019, 11:27 AM
Jim Becker Jim Becker is offline
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What Gary said. For what the recoil is capable of doing it's a great tool to have. But it's not efficient for "turning" ordinary spindles since it's not setup to "turn", per se. It's optimized for ornamental work that you can't do on a regular spinny thing...
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  #9  
Old 02-22-2019, 01:05 PM
mike.davison mike.davison is offline
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Default Thinking beyond plywood

Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveNelson46 View Post
Maybe this is the obvious answer but, ornamental lathes are not for a production shop where time is money. They are more for the "one off" hobbyist where time isn't a factor. As Gary said, if you have the need for speed buy a CNC lathe.
A cost of $300 for a very-specific, nicely done table leg is acceptable for fine pieces. So, even taking 2 hours to mill such a leg on a mid-range CNC rotary is within the ballpark of acceptable. General solution? No. A good approach for Ikea-priced items? No. A good approach for high volume? No. A good use of a $100k machine? No. But, it just might be an approach that is worthy of consideration for some commercial use cases.
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Old 02-23-2019, 09:33 AM
TimberArt TimberArt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike.davison View Post
A cost of $300 for a very-specific, nicely done table leg is acceptable for fine pieces. So, even taking 2 hours to mill such a leg on a mid-range CNC rotary is within the ballpark of acceptable. General solution? No. A good approach for Ikea-priced items? No. A good approach for high volume? No. A good use of a $100k machine? No. But, it just might be an approach that is worthy of consideration for some commercial use cases.
Mike, $300.00 for a leg? Darn I need to move out of the country and back into the city again....lol
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