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Old 10-15-2019, 12:45 PM
JetVette JetVette is offline
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Hey everyone I'm Chris from Greenville SC. I have been building airplanes for the past 14 years so pretty good with my hands. Been browsing around for a while and interested in purchasing a CNC but I still have a lot of questions. I don't have much experience with CNC but I want to learn. What is the best way to start? Classes? Working with someone? Buying a machine and practice? I do not have a ton of experience with wood, but I am learning. I'm really interested in building cabinets for my shop as a first project. Just like to get a little input before making a big purchase. Should I start with a small machine just to get practice or just start big and grow into it? Thanks I appreciate all input and suggestions
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Old 10-15-2019, 01:11 PM
mike.davison mike.davison is offline
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Hmmm.... I'm fairly new to CNC, having just started about 4 years ago, so maybe my path is educational. I investigated online what machines could do, their price points, what I thought I might find useful and then purchased a Stinger II (4x4 with rotary) to learn and see what sort of damage/success I could create. Looking back, that still feels like a reasonable path.

There are introductory classes out there, which are likely helpful.

It's useful to understand what CAD software works nicely with CNC. Vectric products do. Fusion360 is nice. DeskProto is interesting. I like Sketchup for furniture design, but its CNC/CAM support is disappointing.

Lots to explore. I'd encourage you to learn what the machines can generally do and decide if any of that functionality is useful to you. You can get friendly help here about WinCNC and CAMaster. You'll have to poke around elsewhere to get feedback on other systems.
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Old 10-15-2019, 02:21 PM
JetVette JetVette is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike.davison View Post
Hmmm.... I'm fairly new to CNC, having just started about 4 years ago, so maybe my path is educational. I investigated online what machines could do, their price points, what I thought I might find useful and then purchased a Stinger II (4x4 with rotary) to learn and see what sort of damage/success I could create. Looking back, that still feels like a reasonable path.

There are introductory classes out there, which are likely helpful.

It's useful to understand what CAD software works nicely with CNC. Vectric products do. Fusion360 is nice. DeskProto is interesting. I like Sketchup for furniture design, but its CNC/CAM support is disappointing.

Lots to explore. I'd encourage you to learn what the machines can generally do and decide if any of that functionality is useful to you. You can get friendly help here about WinCNC and CAMaster. You'll have to poke around elsewhere to get feedback on other systems.
Iíll look into the machine more . Has the 4x4 machine ever limited you on your work ? One of my worries is a buy a 4x4 and wish I would have just bought the 4x8. Also the same worry of buying a 4x8 and not really needing it. I hate to spend more money than I need to but donít want to regret the decision later.
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Old 10-15-2019, 04:03 PM
guitarwes guitarwes is offline
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Welcome JetVette. I can count on 0 fingers the people that I've heard say "I sure wish I would have bought a smaller machine." That said, a full size machine is not for everyone. Take into the consideration of what you will probably be cutting most of the time and the materials you will be using.

Building the cabinets for your shop = buying lots of sheet goods. Any machine smaller than a 4X8 is going to make you work a little more breaking down sheet goods so they will fit on a smaller table, computing more toolpaths, and possibly decreasing the sheet yield.

Also consider Z height. You said you build airplanes. Sometimes that probably requires a good bit of clearance under the gantry for thicker material. It's a necessity to have the highest Z clearance that you can get.
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  #5  
Old 10-15-2019, 04:39 PM
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james mcgrew james mcgrew is offline
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Ride down to Cola one saturday
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  #6  
Old 10-15-2019, 04:53 PM
DVE2000 DVE2000 is offline
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I would buy this one in a heartbeat: https://camheads.org/showthread.php?p=82964#post82964

It's a steal. Unfortunately.
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Old 10-15-2019, 05:38 PM
Jimwill52 Jimwill52 is offline
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A visit to McGrew's shop is a fantastic opportunity!
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  #8  
Old 10-15-2019, 05:55 PM
Charlie_L Charlie_L is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2012
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If you want to carve propellers Iíd look at 4 by 8. Or, if cutting forms or templates for wing ribs or fixtures. I would get the larger machine.
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  #9  
Old 10-15-2019, 06:39 PM
JetVette JetVette is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by james mcgrew View Post
Ride down to Cola one saturday
Absolutely I will get with you and work out a time to come .
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  #10  
Old 10-15-2019, 06:44 PM
JetVette JetVette is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlie_L View Post
If you want to carve propellers Iíd look at 4 by 8. Or, if cutting forms or templates for wing ribs or fixtures. I would get the larger machine.
I think I gave you guys the wrong impression. My full time job was building airplanes I was just stating so you knew I have some experience in fabrication. I want this as a hobby, I wonít be making any airplane parts with it. (FAA is way to strict). I would like to make money with the machine on weekends but really more of a hobby.
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