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Old 07-31-2014, 02:13 PM
gachua gachua is offline
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Default Plyboo - Bit, Speed, Feed?

So I searched the forum and found two posts on Plyboo, but no machining recommendations. I also found an old post over at Sawmill Creek on this topic, but wanted to get opinions from here.

Has anyone machined 3/4" to 1" bamboo plywood (Plyboo)?

Consensus from the other forum was:
- 2 Flute Chipbreaker Compression Bit
- 18 to 20K RPM
- 200-250 IPM

Have a potential customer that wants a bunch of oddly shaped cutting boards. I've found a local supplier and will pick up a 4x8 sheet tomorrow. "Tad" more expensive than big box store plywood. Want to keep my testing as economical as possible, but understand it is in my best interest to perform due diligence before committing to taking the job.

Thanks...
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Last edited by gachua; 07-31-2014 at 02:20 PM.
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Old 07-31-2014, 02:49 PM
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Gary Campbell Gary Campbell is offline
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Glenn...
I've cut a few dozen sheets of the stuff. Chip breakers, compressions, up and down spirals, even single O flutes with plastic helix angles all work well in one place or another.

Things to watch for: Bamboo ply has a tendency to be brittle and chip out when cut aggressively, or when navigating sharp corners. Make sure that you do test cuts using circular geometries as grain change and ply direction change cutting loads substantially depending on cut direction. Also, density seems to vary a bunch from sheet to sheet.

Assuming they were fair sized cutting boards I would go with a 3/8 compression for a "go to" bit. Test at about .010 chipload, more if large rectangular geometries, down to .007 or .008 if angular or smaller pieces.

This would calc to .008= 12500 rpm @ 200 ipm .010= 12500 rpm @ 250 ipm
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Last edited by Gary Campbell; 07-31-2014 at 03:13 PM. Reason: Added feeds
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Old 07-31-2014, 03:01 PM
dustboy dustboy is offline
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I'd go for a chipload similar to what you would run with solid hard maple. I think bamboo burns pretty easily so make sure the tool keeps moving, ramp all your plunges. On a lighter duty machine like ours, you probably want to run 2 passes.
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Old 07-31-2014, 03:24 PM
gachua gachua is offline
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Thanks guys. I'll let you know how it goes !!
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Old 07-31-2020, 08:37 PM
bution1990 bution1990 is offline
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Intact bamboo poles can be purchased or grown, but far more similar to working with wood is working with engineered bamboo lumber, which can be thought of as a high grade. very hard laminated plywood.

Last edited by bution1990; Yesterday at 02:33 PM. Reason: sspelling mistake
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