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  #21  
Old 11-18-2018, 01:31 PM
Jim Becker Jim Becker is offline
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Originally Posted by Ger21 View Post
The shops I've worked at have had vertical panel saws, and multiple table saws.
The slider only gets used for crosscuts. All ripping is done on the table saws.


The Panel saw is mostly used when the CNC is busy cutting other work.
This kind of arrangement makes a lot of sense for a production shop, especially one with multiple workers. For those of us with "just us" and a smaller footprint, we have to combine all that into one or two machines. For me that's one machine and as noted, I haven't looked back from going to the slider a number of years ago. And other than my tack trunks (which I'm now cutting on my CNC outside of halving the sheets with my track saw) I work primarily in solid stock.
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Jim Becker

SR-44 (2018), 1.7kw spindle, Performance Premium, USB, Keypad, T-Slot table (y-axis configuration), WinCNC, VCarve Pro upgraded to Aspire

Non CNC stuff...

SCM/Minimax - slider/JP/BS
Festool "a good collection"
Stubby - lathe
Oneida Cyclone
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Retired from full time work in the telecom industry 9/2017
Commission work for equestrian tack storage and other custom furniture and cabinetry
Located Bucks County PA
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  #22  
Old 11-18-2018, 03:35 PM
rcrawford rcrawford is offline
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Originally Posted by Jim_in_PA View Post
Russell, my slider IS my table saw in every way imaginable. It replaced a cabinet saw a number of years ago and I haven't looked back.
Maybe its just my slider (a Laguna 5'), but the sliding table is just a little higher than the solid table, which makes it nice for sliding sheets but makes it TERRIBLE for ripping narrow stock (which is a lot of what I do when building furniture). It is possible for me to lower the sliding table a fraction of an inch to make them even, but it is not an easy task, and requires me to dissemble the whole heavy sliding mechanism. Not something I have been willing to tackle yet since I still have a nice tablesaw that I use for ripping!
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  #23  
Old 11-18-2018, 03:43 PM
Jim Becker Jim Becker is offline
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Fritz and Franz is your friend for narrow rips on a slider when the material is already narrow. When ripping off strips from a wider piece, holding it down on flat on the wagon corrects for the slight difference in height between the wagon and the saw table. That said, everyone adapts differently and some folks are happier with a second saw dedicated to just ripping.
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Jim Becker

SR-44 (2018), 1.7kw spindle, Performance Premium, USB, Keypad, T-Slot table (y-axis configuration), WinCNC, VCarve Pro upgraded to Aspire

Non CNC stuff...

SCM/Minimax - slider/JP/BS
Festool "a good collection"
Stubby - lathe
Oneida Cyclone
more...

Retired from full time work in the telecom industry 9/2017
Commission work for equestrian tack storage and other custom furniture and cabinetry
Located Bucks County PA
http://bvww.us
bvww.etsy.com
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  #24  
Old 11-18-2018, 04:32 PM
carasel carasel is offline
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To maybe give you some layout ideas.
When I bought my router. I also bought a vertical saw. Thinking I could get rid of my slider. The vertical didn't work out so well. So I reworked machinery placement. Setting back up the slider.
The slider is 10'. Rarely did I cut more than 8'. I ended up placing the saw. So it will slide to the wall. Just enough to rip 8'. With the cross cut fence pushed close to the slide end.
In order to get enough room to pull the slide back. To cut 8'. I cut a hinged flip up section in my work table. Letting the slide go into the table footprint. Flip the top up and away I cut.
The left end of the cross cut fence. Is 98" away from the end of the bander.
I shortened one shelf section of my lumber rack. Letting the cross cut fence slide between the lumber. This set up has worked well for me.
I also have a table saw. For ripping hardwoods.
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  #25  
Old 11-18-2018, 09:31 PM
locaholic35 locaholic35 is offline
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Quote:
It is possible for me to lower the sliding table a fraction of an inch to make them even, but it is not an easy task, and requires me to dissemble the whole heavy sliding mechanism. Not something I have been willing to tackle yet since I still have a nice tablesaw that I use for ripping!
The initial setup of the sliding mechanism challenged my novice mechanical skills. I certainly do not blame you for not wanting to take that on. I'm hoping I won't have to do that again any time soon.
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  #26  
Old 11-18-2018, 11:17 PM
locaholic35 locaholic35 is offline
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Quote:
Fritz and Franz is your friend for narrow rips on a slider when the material is already narrow.
Jim, I haven't tried the Fritz for rips. With such little wood contact on the front and rear edge, I wrongly assumed it wouldn't be square and I'd bugger things up.

How do you get consistent rip widths? Do you pull the rip fence rearward and reference off the rip fence for your dimensioning?
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  #27  
Old 11-18-2018, 11:21 PM
locaholic35 locaholic35 is offline
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Quote:
To maybe give you some layout ideas.

In order to get enough room to pull the slide back. To cut 8'. I cut a hinged flip up section in my work table. Letting the slide go into the table footprint. Flip the top up and away I cut.
The left end of the cross cut fence. Is 98" away from the end of the bander.
I shortened one shelf section of my lumber rack. Letting the cross cut fence slide between the lumber. This set up has worked well for me.
I also have a table saw. For ripping hardwoods.
Haha this sounds familiar. When the felder rep swung by my shop he was pretty shocked I was able to squeeze one in to such a small space. Sounds like you are making things work with some ingenuity.
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  #28  
Old 11-19-2018, 09:21 AM
Jim Becker Jim Becker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by locaholic35 View Post
Jim, I haven't tried the Fritz for rips. With such little wood contact on the front and rear edge, I wrongly assumed it wouldn't be square and I'd bugger things up.

How do you get consistent rip widths? Do you pull the rip fence rearward and reference off the rip fence for your dimensioning?
I use the F&F for both narrow rips on narrow stock and for parallel ripping of components. Yes, it's a little slower, but the quality of the cut and edge makes up for that. It also means I can rip something "not parallel" to the original edge for grain matching purposes and later flip it around between the F&F and get a nice component ripped to width along the grain line rather than the original rough edge. If your F&F is setup properly, it will always provide a parallel rip. Don't underestimate the force you can exert with the F&F on the workpiece as you make your cut, too. If your blade is sharp, even better... :)

It's just a different way of working. While some folks are discomforted by the fact that it may be slower, I find that to be a positive thing as it keeps me from rushing and we all know that Mr Murphy LOVES it when we rush...
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Jim Becker

SR-44 (2018), 1.7kw spindle, Performance Premium, USB, Keypad, T-Slot table (y-axis configuration), WinCNC, VCarve Pro upgraded to Aspire

Non CNC stuff...

SCM/Minimax - slider/JP/BS
Festool "a good collection"
Stubby - lathe
Oneida Cyclone
more...

Retired from full time work in the telecom industry 9/2017
Commission work for equestrian tack storage and other custom furniture and cabinetry
Located Bucks County PA
http://bvww.us
bvww.etsy.com
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  #29  
Old 11-19-2018, 08:14 PM
rcrawford rcrawford is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim_in_PA View Post
Fritz and Franz is your friend for narrow rips on a slider when the material is already narrow. When ripping off strips from a wider piece, holding it down on flat on the wagon corrects for the slight difference in height between the wagon and the saw table. That said, everyone adapts differently and some folks are happier with a second saw dedicated to just ripping.
Hmm. I gotta look into this Fritz and Franz thing. Do you use dado blades on your slider as well? I find a Unisaw so much easier to set up for dado cuts, but maybe that's because I haven't given the slider a chance!
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  #30  
Old 11-20-2018, 08:24 PM
locaholic35 locaholic35 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim_in_PA View Post
I use the F&F for both narrow rips on narrow stock and for parallel ripping of components. Yes, it's a little slower, but the quality of the cut and edge makes up for that. It also means I can rip something "not parallel" to the original edge for grain matching purposes and later flip it around between the F&F and get a nice component ripped to width along the grain line rather than the original rough edge. If your F&F is setup properly, it will always provide a parallel rip. Don't underestimate the force you can exert with the F&F on the workpiece as you make your cut, too. If your blade is sharp, even better... :)
I will have to expand my use of this helpful jig. Thanks for getting me excited about trying some new things!

Quote:
It's just a different way of working. While some folks are discomforted by the fact that it may be slower, I find that to be a positive thing as it keeps me from rushing and we all know that Mr Murphy LOVES it when we rush...
Murphy loves to pop in when I am rushing!
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